The Japanese Philosophy of Wabi-Sabi

The Japanese Philosophy of Wabi-Sabi

There is beauty to be found in all things. Our quest for inspiration leads us back, time and again, to the Japanese philosophy Wabi-Sabi.
 
Our search for beautiful antique furnishings, vintage and gently ‘loved,’ has helped develop a taste for the organic charm of a diamond still in the rough. Sometimes updating a vintage acquisition helps give it new life, but personally, we search for special pieces with just the right amount of wear and tear.
From home furnishings to the spaces we live in, beautiful decay adds character and depth. Metal changes over time, shaping the material and changing its color and texture. Wood wears every life scar beautifully, like wrinkles on a face, the more you use it, the better it gets. Leather is our favorite, getting softer with use and developing a patina that is completely unique to each individual piece.
Our Le Corbusier chair with the original leather is the chicest seat in the house. The above images are (mostly) our personal takes on Wabi-Sabi, but below are a few of our favorite rooms, perfect examples of the philosophy at work, and absolutely spectacular interiors.
Axel Vervoordt is the finest example of contemporary, and highly intentional, Wabi Sabi. His use of aged, natural, materials and minimalist form gives his interiors a feeling of warmth and history. We swoon for all his epic designs.
The New Mexico home of American painter Georgia O’Keeffe is a study in instinctual Wabi Sabi and one of our most loved inspirations. Austere and striking, but spiritual and unintentionally edgy, her home is a reflection of the artist and her spirit.
 
Another room that channels the very essence of Wabi Sabi, Alan Donovan’s home in Kenya, a fine collection of local, artisanal creations, put together in perfectly imperfect harmony.